Explore Hopi Consignment Art

Protecting Earth

Protecting Earth by (c) Dickson Silas

This artwork is a collaboration piece by three artists: myself, Wyatt Yazzie, and Shenina Silas. Shenina, who is my 15-year- old daughter, painted all the designs in the background. In the middle of the artwork is the Wuyak’tiwa or Broad face Kachina. This kachina is known as being the protector. Here he is protecting the star kachinas from harm, guarding the earth, and watching all that move on earth. The two kachinas on the side are the Sakwa-Ahota ( Blue Star Kachina) and Siikya-Ahota (Yellow Star Kachina). In Hopi prophecy, these two kachinas protect the earth from huge comets. The earth is painted black because of all the chaos we humans are creating. In due time the Blue and Yellow Star Kachina will let the galaxy destroy earth. On the right side of the painting is “Tawa” or father Sun, he is trying to shine light on the earth to give people strength, courage, and ability to live peacefully. The designs in the background resemble stitchings holding the earth together.
 

Artists: Dickson Silas, Wyatt Yazzie & Shenina Silas

 

Protecting Earth, by Dickson Silas, Wyatt Yazzie &
Shenina Silas 
84" x 60" acrylic markers on canvas
$1,800

For purchase contact: Hannah Honani

Email: hhonani@explorehopi.com

Phone: 928/206-9463 or 928/734-0044

Hopi Consignment art prints coming soon!

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Prayer for Good Life

This piece of artwork is all about prayer. All the kachinas in the artwork have prayer feathers. The “Ahola” or Chief of the Kachinas, is in the middle and he takes care of all the kachinas like a father. Below and to the left of the “Ahola” is the “Ang-ak-china” or Long Hair Kachina, Kachinmana, and Koyemsi. They are praying for a good spring and summer making people happy. In the upper left-hand side is “Kyaa-ru”, or Parrot Kachina, making offerings so that small and large birds have a good life.  Next to the parrot is the Heoto, he is making offerings so that all warrior kachinas are strong in protecting the earth. In the top right side of the painting is the Turtle Kachina with “Pachavun Mana” and the Long-Hair maiden, these two are making offerings for all reptiles and sea creatures so the oceans can be healthy.

Prayer for Good Life, by Dickson Silas &
Alena Silas 
84" x 60" acrylic markers on canvas
$2,350

Top corner is “Umtoinaqa” or “making thunder” kachina, he is praying for a good monsoon season so that crops can grow strong and healthy. On the bottom right corner is the “Sowi-ing” or Deer Kachina, praying for all woodland animals to be strong, healthy, and so that Hopi men may have a successful hunting season. As you can see all the designs are by Hopi women of Sitsomovi village, who would use these designs on their pottery. My 13-year-old daughter, Alena Silas, did all the designs in the background.

For purchase contact: Hannah Honani

Email: hhonani@explorehopi.com

Phone: 928/206-9463 or 928/734-0044

Hopi Consignment art prints coming soon!

About the artist by Dickson Silas

 

My name is Dickson Silas. I live in Sichomovi village, which is located on First Mesa. I was born and raised in Sichomovi village. I graduated from Hopi Jr/Sr High School and went on to school to study HVAC in Glendale, Arizona.
 

I first started drawing in elementary school where my teachers encouraged me to continue drawing. It wasn’t until my senior year in high school, that I got serious about my artwork and started entering art shows to represent Hopi High. I won some awards for my artwork. From then on, I began to experiment with drawing birthday cards, holiday greeting cards, etc. When I became a father, I then pushed myself to sell my artwork to tourists for income.

About 2 summers ago I met Ivan Liotchev, who is an artist. He wanted me to do a project for him and I agreed. He arrived in July and asked if I was ready to draw, not knowing what type of project he was going to give me. I realized he wanted me to draw on this big 8 feet by 4 feet canvas. I have never done anything this huge before. So I attempted this project by using canvas marker ink and visualizing what I would draw in my head. I sometimes dream of what I will create and as I create my pieces, the whole vision comes together naturally.

I take pride in my work and thank my kids every day for motivating me to pursue
a passion and talent that not so many people are given.                                                                    
Dickson Silas

Hopi artist, Dickson Silas

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My Father (c) Frank Honahnie Jr

My Father

As a Hopi father, Tawa is who we pray to. We pray for happiness and good health for all living things.

Artist: Frank Honahnie Jr.

 

About the artist by Frank Honahnie, Jr.

 

My name is Frank Honahnie Jr. I am a member of the Bamboo clan. I currently reside in Kykotsmovi, Arizona. I’ve been studying and doing the Hopi art for the last 30 years. In my past experiences as a Hopi artist, my art has evolved into a whole new level of art. I look at my art as a new way of art form getting away from the old and traditional way and to experience a new and exciting way of Hopi art. 

 

Frank Honahnie, Jr.

Hopi artist Frank Honahnie Jr

My Father, by Frank Honanhie Jr. 
54" x 54" acrylic with pumis sand on canvas
$800

For purchase contact: Hannah Honani

Email: hhonani@explorehopi.com

Phone: 928/206-9463 or 928/734-0044

Hopi Consignment art prints coming soon!

Coming to Hopi by (c) Frank Honanhie Jr.

Healing Bear by (c) Frank Honanhie Jr.

Life by (c) Frank Honahnie Jr.

Singing Hummingbird by (c) Frank Honanhie Jr.

Coming to Hopi
Healing Bear
Life
Singing Hummingbird

Coming to Hopi by Frank Honanhie Jr. 
$200

Healing Bear by Frank Honanhie Jr. 
$200

Life by Frank Honanhie Jr. 
$200

Singing Hummingbird by Frank Honanhie Jr. 
$200

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Black Bear by (c) Garrett Honahnie

Yellow Bear by Garrett Honahnie

Half Clown by Garrett Honahnie

Black Bear
Yellow Bear
Half Clown

Black Bear by Garrett Honanhie 
$350

Yellow Bear by Garrett Honanhie 
$350

Half Clown by Garrett Honanhie 
$350

Half Clown, Half Kachina Doll
Black Bear & Yellow Bear Kachina Dolls

Bears are healing in nature and, in Hopi, are seen as leaders and known for their strength. They wear a medicine pouch to symbolize their healing power. On the bottom of the doll, corn and rain are represented by the colored dots. The color of the dots represents the many colored corn that is grown on Hopi. The rain symbolizes moisture drops that fall from the clouds, which are resembled by the feathers on the doll.

The shading of colors represents happiness and joy to which the clown brings to all people. He carries his “mama doll” as all clowns do that symbolizes family unity. He wears his corn pollen pouch for the kachinas, which is his other half, and the sweet corn that is a gift for all people. On the back, is a Mud Head or Koyemsi, that represents the kachina side of the doll. 

About the artist by Garrett Honahnie

 

My name is Garrett Honahnie, and I am from the village Kykotsmovi. My clan is Bamboo, and my father is of the Coyote clan from the village of Moenkopi. My artwork tells stories, which in my family, storytelling goes back to my great grandmother. I use the colors and different symbols to tell stories of Hopi and the meaning of all things that we see, hear, taste and touch. My artwork talents consist of Kachina dolls, gourds, magnets, and drawings amongst many others. I mostly use acrylic paint along with some natural pigments in my painting. The wood I use is of the cottonwood root and others.

                                                                   
Garrett Honahnie

Hopi artist Garrett Honahnie

For purchase contact: Hannah Honani

Email: hhonani@explorehopi.com

Phone: 928/206-9463 or 928/734-0044

Hopi Consignment art prints coming soon!

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